‘It’s Just a Little Cortisol’: Why Rises in Cortisol Matter to Infant Development

2019-03-28T22:23:56-04:00

The dismissal of the importance of a rise in cortisol on the developing brain is very popular with extinction sleep training apologists. Although we do not know the exact influences, there are reasons to be cautious of this dismissal, which ignores key evolutionary and biological information.

‘It’s Just a Little Cortisol’: Why Rises in Cortisol Matter to Infant Development2019-03-28T22:23:56-04:00

Distress, Self-Soothing, and Extinction Sleep Training

2019-03-28T22:23:56-04:00

The premise behind extinction sleep training is that infants (and toddlers) are being taught to "self-soothe"; however, this ignores key points of what self-soothing abilities can be expected from children and how distressed they are at the time of separation. Instead of focusing on these extinction methods, gentler methods that respect where the child is developmentally should be considered.

Distress, Self-Soothing, and Extinction Sleep Training2019-03-28T22:23:56-04:00

How Effective is Controlled Crying? (Hint: Not Very)

2019-03-28T22:24:01-04:00

Doctors, family, and baby "experts" like to promote cry-it-out and controlled crying as forms of sleep interventions for infants despite protests that it ignores infant communication and stresses parents out. What if, contrary to what parents are told, it also doesn't really work too well?

How Effective is Controlled Crying? (Hint: Not Very)2019-03-28T22:24:01-04:00

Gentle Sleep Resources

2019-03-28T22:24:10-04:00

Often when I write about crying-it-out or controlled crying, I get comments from people who have done it asking what else they should have done in their sleep deprived state. The question concerns me because it highlights not only how mainstream the idea of leaving a child to cry has become, but also about how ignorant society is as a whole about the alternatives to sleep training.

Gentle Sleep Resources2019-03-28T22:24:10-04:00