Guest Post: Your Brain in Birth? Labor from the neurological-physiological perspective of the mother

A guest post examining how our knowledge of neuroscience can help us better prepare for birth and understand the effects of various interventions and practices on our experience of birth.

Controlled Crying, Cortisol, and Attachment: A Critical Look

New research is making the rounds claiming that there are no negative effects to controlled crying, and the press is lapping it up. The question is: Does the claim hold up?

Stress and Extinction Sleep Training: It’s Not So Simple

When you talk about stress and sleep training, you often get two polarized views: Either the stress is so great it has to cause irreparable harm or it's fine or even beneficial. Yet neither really captures the whole story.

Daycare and Cortisol Levels: What Does This Tell Us?

New research looks at cortisol patterns in infants, toddlers, and children as they adapt to new daycare situations. The findings aren't encouraging, but should be considered in the larger framework of research on child care.

When Anger Isn’t Really Anger: The Relationship Between Fear and Anger

Sometimes our children's anger can seem irrational or out-of-place given the circumstances and in turn we react defensively and with anger ourselves. What if we could see the anger as really fear-based and respond in kind?

Are We Setting Up Parents to Sleep Train?

In pondering the use of CIO and CC further, I start to wonder if those of us who speak out against sleep training may be inadvertently setting families up to fail. Hear me out…

Slate Gets on the Cry-it-Out Bandwagon

The entire tagline reads “A journal jumps on the Dr. Sears bandwagon to say sleep training is dangerous. Science says otherwise.” Let’s first get something clear – journals publish special issues all the time and journals publish research and opinion pieces and reviews from researchers who work in the relevant fields.

4 Steps to Help with Baby’s Transition to a New Caregiver

Transitioning to a new caregiver can be hard for everyone involved. If you have the time to transition slowly, these four steps can help avoid dreaded crying fits when you leave and help your child remain secure and comfortable.

The “Life Lessons” Fallacy

Why I go crazy when I hear people say they are engaging in specific parenting practices in order to teach their baby/toddler/child about the real world.

Does a new study really support leaving your child to cry?

So, what is this new research? It’s an article by Masha Weinraub and colleagues on sleep patterns, notably night wakenings, in children aged six months to three years . Now, let’s ignore what the popular press has reported and actually look at the study itself…